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Signs of reliable and unreliable research, reason and persuasion, and an RIP.

April 29, 2014

I thought I had more cool posts to share, but I got so wrapped up in the Baumol disease I got discombobulated.

But, yes, plenty more of good posts to share, so I’m sharing them now.

About a week ago, my bud Daniel Lakens reported on this Find on his blog. A paper even older than me! Yes, people have been thinking about these issues for a long time.

Sylvia McLain asks if Spotting Bad Science really is as easy as a nice poster giving instructions on how to do it. And, of course, if it really were, there wouldn’t be as much bad science. But, as a handy dandy tool it can be a useful beginning tool. The creator of the poster answers in the comments, and there is a good conversation.

Speaking of Bad Science, JP de Ruiter linked in a Brain Pickings article highlighting Carl Sagans baloney detector kit (got that?)

Tom Stafford linked in his draft of this very lovely article on rational argument. He brings up both Cialdini, and argument as a means of persuasion rather than correctness. As it is draft 2, it may evolve further, but I thought it was just great.

Last month, Keith Laws and others debated whether CBT for psychosis had been oversold. It was all filmed, so you can check it here (as I watched it at the same time as I was reading about montage and cutting techniques, I found myself wishing for some of those, plus a good sound engineer, but you can’t have everything). A Storify from Alex Langford appears here. I considered it a good example how a good anecdote trumps good data as far as persuasion goes – which ties in with the Cialdini in Tom Stafford’s piece, but I’m not a clinician. Worth checking out though.

Last, I was very sad to hear that Seth Roberts died. I’ve followed his blog for a few years by now, and I thought him very interesting, innovative and thoughtful (I even posted on his comments once, regarding all this Stapel fraud stuff, as he has been involved in that).

 

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